Marketing Your Book With Amazon Ads

Marketing Your Book With Amazon Ads

Amazon’s advertising business is booming during the pandemic. It’s growing faster than its retail, cloud computing, and Prime subscription divisions—and chipping away at Google’s dominant position. – Financial Times

“Enormous power consolidated around a small number of major online platforms such as Facebook, Amazon, and Google will jeopardize future independence for authors. These dominant platforms wield their supreme power to stand between you and your audience. We’ve traded one group of authoritarian overlords for another. These platforms are the new gatekeepers for indie authors. And access comes at a cost: advertising. – Mark Coker, CEO and founder at Smashwords

I was an early advocate of advertising books with Amazon ads. In my experience, the most effective and economical marketing solution for making a book known is with Amazon ads. When I ran LPC, Amazon ads served as our core marketing strategy. Our goal was to receive $1 in revenue for every 30 cents invested. Many times we could invest as little as fifteen cents to earn $1. Those days are gone. Now many Amazon ads only break even (invest $1, receive back $1). Still, if your goal is to make your book known and you do not mind losing some money in the process, Amazon ads remain a good option.

Based on my experience Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are poor ad dollar investments. This makes sense when you think about. These platforms appeal to a large audience. With Amazon ads you target readers of print and Kindle ebooks and from within that market, you aim for niche category readers.

Bookbub is another advertising option, though again I have found Bookbub ads to be less effective than Amazon. Bookbub also lacks the granular diversity necessary to tailor your book’s add to a specific set of readers. For example, YA and middle grade are two segments, but there is no genre distinctions beyond age. An ad for a YA coming-of-age novel will appear along side YA mystery and romance novels.

All the things that worked in the past to drive sales:
  • Amazon Ads
  • Bookbub ads
  • KDP free days
  • KDP countdown days
  • Email newsletter promotions
  • Free audiobook codes
  • Publisher Rocket ebook and print keywords research
  • Facebook launch
  • Rafflcopter
  • Ask David tweets
  • Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Parlor tweets
  • BookFunnel for reviews

no longer return the results author’s enjoyed in years past. This is not surprising. With social media and the Internet, that new thing that worked for you on Friday is shared over the weekend with friends and by Monday all the world is adopting your strategy.

I would love to hear your thoughts on what works and does not.

Keep Your Image Current

If you expect others to follow you, your brand, and books, keep your image current. This requires consistent care and attention. After all, your goal is to inspire others and increase the reach of your online identity.

Here are a few ways you can remain active and visible:

MaintainYourImage_blog MaintainYourImage_facebook MaintainYourImage_twitter MaintainYourImage_linkedin
Be Heard. Post something every day. It can be a paragraph, photo, video… anything. Post a status message daily. Make it informative and engaging. Find a few items, quotes, ideas, worth retweeting every day. Go to the Answers section. See if you have something to contribute to the Q&A.
Show You Listen. Check your comments section on a daily basis, and reply. Respond promptly to any comments on your wall. Reply to three or more tweets with substantive responses. Accept any invitations soon after you get them.
Reach Out. Check out the blogs of the people who comment on yours, and if you find something interesting, comment back. Pick three or four people each day and comment on their updates. Find 5–10 new people to follow. Request a recommendation… or offer to write one for someone else.
Engage. Ask another blogger about creating a guest post. If you belong to groups or fan pages, leave a new comment. Identify several people you feel are worth following—it shows where you’re coming from. Join a new group.

Finally, follow the 80/20 rule. Talk about other things 80% of the time, your book 20%. Tweet and comment about other authors, their books. In short, follow the Golden (80/20) Rule and watch your influence spread.

(Tips and ideas provided by ACX, the leader in Audiobook creation.)